A leadership book for the new leader

by Jamie Flinchbaugh on March 5, 2015 · 0 comments

You are a talented engineer. You’ve lead technical research and product development teams. But running a team is one thing. Now you’re promoted to a role where leading is just about all you need to do. That’s a great time to pick up a book from my friend Stephanie Olexa titled The L.E.A.R.N.E.D. Leader. L.E.A.R.N.E.D […]

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What do you consider the most challenging unsolved problems today for the lean community?

03.03.2015

Over 20 years ago, the biggest challenge was just getting buy-in to even try lean. And as we’ve continued to learn together, we’ve tackled lean culture / behaviors, leadership engagement, business strategy, and much, much more. What’s left? What are the largely unsolved problems that lean needs the best minds to engage?  

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A new lean podcast, Lean Leadership by Chris Burnham

03.01.2015

I encourage lean learners to have multiple sources of learning. Podcasts are a very useful part of the learning portfolio. I have contributed to several podcasts, particularly one of the originals, Mark Graban’s podcasts, and more recently, Gemba Academy’s podcasts. For Mark, I am numbers 5, 6, 10, 64. Mark’s now up to #217 (hey […]

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A must-read leadership book: Leadership Without Excuses

02.15.2015

There are 1,000s of leadership books out there. And for good reason. Leadership is one of the secret weapons of success whether it be in lean transformation in a Fortune 50 company or running a 3-person startup or running a high school science class. It’s really far too important to be condensed to one topic…leadership. […]

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Valuing the small improvement

02.12.2015

This post originally appeared on the Lean Learning Center blog. Small improvements matter. Yet, organizations often de-value them because they are small. They don’t always do it intentionally. They may simple OVER-value the big improvements, through recognition and reward. Here are three important reasons to value making small improvements: 1. It’s how you learn and […]

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Losing Control of Your Lean Journey [Lessons from the Road]

02.11.2015

Do you feel a little out of control of your lean journey? Good. The lean journey is not one that can be so self-contained that one person or team can keep their arms around it. If they can, it either hasn’t reached that important transitional point, or you are choking it off. In this month’s […]

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The Lean Strategy Video Series Summary

01.14.2015

A few years ago I develop a short video series on Lean Strategy. Given my last post challenged you not to start the year without a clear strategy and purpose, I thought it was worthwhile to dust off this video series and re-release it. I had a lot of offline comments about it, and I’m […]

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How did you spend the first week of the new year?

01.11.2015

How did you spend the first week of the new year? If you were like many people, you spent it doing some pretty common things such as catching up on emails and going to some standing meetings, many of which probably began with people trying to remember why we have this particular standing meeting. It’s […]

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One of my least favorite questions

12.16.2014

I get a lot of questions – during my coaching and advisory visits, after delivering a speech, by email, by phone, and sometimes from conversations started in airports. I try to answer every last one of them, which could be a full time job all by itself. But there is one question that is one […]

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Reflections on coaching (from Andy Carlino)

12.11.2014

My friend and co-author Andy Carlino had a great idea for his blog site. He shares Reflections in 3 columns – What’s good? What’s bad? What do I think? – on different topics. At this time he is covering coaching. I encourage you to visit the home page at AndyCarlino.com to read it for yourself. […]

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