respect for people

Practicing Lean

04.28.2017

The idea that just as doctors practice medicine we must practice lean is the premise of a book I contributed to called Practicing Lean which was edited by Mark Graban. We must be wiling to evolve our practices and learn as we move forward.   Order a copy of the book today on Kindle or paperback.  You […]

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4 myths about the principle of “Respect for People”

12.07.2011

The principle of Respect for People has received greater attention in the lean community over the past several years. Books, blogs, and speeches have all given attention to its importance. Both companies and customers are made up of people, and the best profits and processes in the world are not worth it if they lay […]

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Ignoring a wrong behavior is not much different than endorsing it

09.07.2011

What do you do when you see one of your directs exhibiting the wrong behavior? Do you react? Do you pretend you didn’t notice? Do you call it out immediately? There is a common phrase, which I don’t is well understood, that states: “praise publicly, criticized privately.” While I do believe that actual criticism should […]

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Integrity is unrecoverable

07.26.2011

Lost money can be re-earned. Lost time can be clawed back. Lost love reignited. Lost integrity is unrecoverable. I posted this phrase on Twitter and Facebook recently. I took some “feedback” for it. Some argued that time lost was lost. Truly, it is. But if I needed x hours to get something done and I […]

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Are you tired of meetings that don’t start on time?

11.29.2010

If you were to calculate the actual time lost, meetings that don’t start on time is perhaps one of the single biggest generators of waste in organizations today. A meeting that starts 5 minutes late for 4 people waiting for 1 other person wastes 20 minutes. If it’s a daily meeting, that’s an hour a […]

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“I disagree…” should be celebrated, not stricken

10.27.2010

In today’s politically correct world, conflict is avoided seemingly at all costs. But without active conflict management, good decisions cannot be made. I propose we need more tolerance rather than more sensitivity. As a sign of how overly far sensitivity has gone, we were once told not to use the phrase “bull in a china […]

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Be Respectful, but for the right reason

10.25.2010

In the age of self-help, self-promotion, and self-everything-else, it seems that even basic human principles lose meaning. In this blog post by Manager Tools (which I highly respect and listen to their podcasts) called Be Respectful, it either argues or forwards the argument from Wired Magazine as follows: An article in Wired magazine reminds us […]

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People are not assets

10.20.2010

What is an asset? By definition, it is “a single item of ownership having exchange value.” Exchange value, as in buy and sell. Sounds a bit like slavery to me, which is still this country’s most shameful part of its history. Why are assets on the balance sheet? So that you can value you the […]

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Finding the hidden “mouse” skills in every team member

09.22.2010

It’s too bad everyone isn’t just like us, isn’t it? Wouldn’t the world be a better place? Of course not. But our behaviors often suggest that we do hang on to this belief. We are far more likely to recognize the skills and talents of others if those skills and talents are much like ours. […]

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When to coach the process, and when to coach the solution

09.09.2010

Do you think of yourself as a coach? When I ask this question, almost every single hand goes up. But what does that really mean? Do we have a process? Or do we confuse sharing our little bits of wisdom with coaching? To be an effective coach, you must combine process with intention. Today I […]

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